Speak Now: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe

Narnia is an enchanting story, one of my favouries from my childhood. I couldn’t wait more to show The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe to my daughter. I skip the bombing scene and start with the children arriving to the professor’s house. Here’s an example how we talk about the story while we’re watching it:

13

  • Look, the children are playing hide and seek. Who’s counting?
  • Peter. Suzan, Edmund and Lucy are hiding.
  • Suzan is hiding in a chest. Edmund is hiding behind a curtain. What about Lucy?
  • 3
  • She is going to a room.
  • Look! What is it? What is there under the sheet?
  • 7
  • It’s a wardrobe.
  • Lucy is hiding in the wardrobe. Look,there are fur coats. More fur coats and then..
  • 1
  • Snow and trees!
  • Yes, it is snowing! It’s beautiful!
  • And look, a lamp post.
  • 11
  • Someone’s coming. Who is it? They are both scared. Look. He’s got goat’s legs and a human body. It’s a faun.
  • He is Mr Tumnus.
  • 5
  • He asks: Are you a dwarf?
  • No, she’s a girl.
  • Are you from Narnia?
  • No. From England.
  • He invites her to his cave. For tea.
  • Mr Tumnus plays a lullaby. It’s beautiful music.
  • 4
  • Look at the fire. It’s magic.
  • 6
  • There are horses and dancers and… Aslan.
  • He’s angry.
  • Yes, he is very angry with Mr Tumnus.
  • But why?
  • Because he wants to take Lucy to the Witch.

I could continue this conversation, but I think it’s already given you an insight how we practise English while watching the film. I deliberately didn’t mark which part is said by my daughter because as she gets more familiar with the story and language, she will lead the conversation.

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